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Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase deficiency, haematopoiesis and fertility in the mouse.

TitleHypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase deficiency, haematopoiesis and fertility in the mouse.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1991
AuthorsAnsell JD, Samuel K, Whittingham DG, Patek CE, Hardy K, Handyside AH, Jones KW, Muggleton-Harris AL, A Taylor H, Hooper ML
JournalDevelopment
Volume112
Issue2
Pagination489-98
Date Published1991 Jun
ISSN0950-1991
KeywordsAnimals, Brain, Chimera, Disease Models, Animal, DNA Probes, Female, Fertility, Glucose-6-Phosphate Isomerase, Hematopoiesis, Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase, Isoenzymes, Male, Mice, Nucleic Acid Hybridization, Phosphoglycerate Kinase, Sex Chromosome Aberrations
Abstract

We have looked for effects of deficiency in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) in the mouse comparable to non-behavioural consequences of HPRT-deficiency in humans. HPRT-deficient humans show abnormalities in haematopoiesis and, in heterozygotes, there is strong selection in haematopoietic tissues against HPRT-deficient cells arising as a result of X-chromosome inactivation. We have examined two situations in mice in which HPRT- and HPRT+ cells occur in the same individual. First, in chimaeras resulting from the injection of HPRT- embryonal stem cells into HPRT+ blastocysts the fate of HPRT- and HPRT+ cell populations was monitored by their expression of different isozymes of glucose phosphate isomerase and also, in those chimaeras that resulted from injecting the male ES cells into female blastocysts, by in situ hybridisation using a Y-chromosome-specific repetitive DNA probe. There was a small statistically significant selection against the HPRT- population in haematopoietic tissues in both XX in equilibrium with XY and XY in equilibrium with XY chimaeras. Second, in female mice doubly heterozygous for HPRT-deficiency and for an electrophoretic variant of the X-linked enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase, there was a similar small statistically significant selection against the HPRT- population in haematopoietic tissues. While further work is required to establish whether this selection is a consequence of the HPRT mutation, it is clear that any selection against cells in the haematopoietic system as a consequence of HPRT-deficiency is at most small compared with the effect seen in humans. In HPRT-deficient human males surviving beyond the normal age of puberty, there is testicular atrophy. However, we find no effect of HPRT-deficiency on the fertility of either male or female mice. Thus, as with effects on behaviour, the consequences of HPRT-deficiency for haematopoiesis and testis development in the mouse are at most small compared with those in the human. We conclude that the reason for the difference in effects between the two species lies in a difference in purine-related intermediary metabolism per se, rather than in its interaction with brain amine biochemistry.

Alternate JournalDevelopment
PubMed ID1794318