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Distribution of the lipolysis stimulated receptor in adult and embryonic murine tissues and lethality of LSR-/- embryos at 12.5 to 14.5 days of gestation.

TitleDistribution of the lipolysis stimulated receptor in adult and embryonic murine tissues and lethality of LSR-/- embryos at 12.5 to 14.5 days of gestation.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsMesli S, Javorschi S, Bérard AM, Landry M, Priddle H, Kivlichan D, Smith AG, Yen FT, Bihain BE, Darmon M
JournalEur J Biochem
Volume271
Issue15
Pagination3103-14
Date Published2004 Aug
ISSN0014-2956
KeywordsAnimals, Blotting, Northern, Embryo Loss, Embryo, Mammalian, Female, Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Gene Deletion, Genotype, Gestational Age, Kidney, Liver, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Pregnancy, Receptors, LDL, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, RNA, Messenger, Time Factors
Abstract

The lipolysis stimulated receptor (LSR) recognizes apolipoprotein B/E-containing lipoproteins in the presence of free fatty acids, and is thought to be involved in the clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL). The distribution of LSR in mice was studied by Northern blots, quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence. In the adult, LSR mRNA was detectable in all tissues tested except muscle and heart, and was abundant in liver, lung, intestine, kidney, ovaries and testes. During embryogenesis, LSR mRNA was detectable at 7.5 days post-coitum (E7) and increased up to E17 in parallel to prothrombin, a liver marker. In adult liver, immunofluorescence experiments showed a staining at the periphery of hepatocytes as well as in fetal liver at E12 and E15. These results are in agreement with the assumption that LSR is a plasma membrane receptor involved in the clearance of lipoproteins by liver, and suggest a possible role in steroidogenic organs, lung, intestine and kidney). To explore the role of LSR in vivo, the LSR gene was inactivated in 129/Ola ES cells by removing a gene segment containing exons 2-5, and 129/Ola-C57BL/6 mice bearing the deletion were produced. Although heterozygotes appeared normal, LSR homozygotes were not viable, with the exception of three males, while the total progeny of genotyped wild-type and heterozygote pups was 345. Mortality of the homozygote embryos was observed between days 12.5 and 15.5 of gestation, a time at which their liver was much smaller than that of their littermates, indicating that the expression of LSR is critical for liver and embryonic development.

DOI10.1111/j.1432-1033.2004.04223.x
Alternate JournalEur. J. Biochem.
PubMed ID15265030